MISSION: END PREVENTABLE BLINDNESS

Your Diet Counts The loss of sight induces a sense of fear that almost feels primal. When one of our most frequently used senses fails to function, we feel threatened and we are forced to acclimate by relying more heavily on our senses of hearing and touch. Perhaps this natural association of vision loss with danger accounts for the fear that we experience when diagnosed with a condition like age-related macular degeneration (AMD). According to AMD.org, this condition is the primary cause of severe vision loss, worsens with age, and...

Carotenoid Supplements For Improving Contrast Sensitivity Carotenoid supplementation, such as Eye Love’s Ocular Health Formula, can lead to statistically significant increases in contrast sensitivity revealed a study in June’s Investigative Ophthalmology & Vision Science. This science-based evidence could be particularly beneficial to athletes and members of the military, as both must quickly identify fast-moving or small objects. Study participants were given 10 mg of lutein and 2 mg of zeaxanthin, which is the exact dosage in our formula. Did you enjoy this quick tip? We’d love to start sharing more,...

Macular Degeneration or Macular Hole? What’s the Difference? Many people each year go blind or have severely impaired vision as a result of macular degeneration. Macular degeneration is a progressive eye disease, mostly associated with age, that affects millions of Americans each year. In fact, it’s the leading cause of vision loss for senior citizens in America. What is Macular Degeneration? Macular degeneration occurs in the macula, the region at the center of the eye’s retina. It’s the part of the eye that responds most readily to light and allows...

Symptoms of Wet Macular Degeneration Symptoms of degrading vision often build slowly and go unnoticed for a long period of  time until they reach a degree of severity that may no longer be ignored. One may notice that he or she now needs glasses to read the text of a favorite book or magazine. Headaches grow more frequent - the result of constantly strained eye muscles. Once bright and vibrant colors may even take on more dull and muted hues. While many conditions may result in impaired vision, wet macular...

Why and How Macular Degeneration Affects Vision Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) affects vision because the macula is part of the retina of the eye. The macula is located behind the lens on the back of the eyeball and helps images get to the optic nerve so they can be interpreted by the brain. The macula has the specific purpose of focusing fine details and enables people to read, drive, and see things like facial expressions. So when the macula starts to break down and become dysfunctional, the central field of...


Age-Related Macular Degeneration Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is damage that occurs to the macula which is located in the back of the eye, directly at the line of sight. The macula is the part of the eye that is responsible for sharp central vision, which enables a person to pinpoint objects and recognize faces. This deterioration occurs from older age in many individuals, as the name suggests. There are two types of AMD. The first type is dry AMD, which is characterized by a breakdown of the macular tissues...

Driving With Macular Degeneration Macular Degeneration is a deterioration of the eye that affects the retina, which records the images we see and sends them to the brain. The macula is the center part of the retina, and it is what we use to focus so we can do things like drive and read. The disease also affects how we process colors, fine objects, and facial recognition. Macular Degeneration affects 10 million people in the United States.  Complications with Driving Driving, to the American people, has long represented freedom. No...


Hallucinations Associated with Macular Degeneration  An issue sometimes confronting people with advanced macular degeneration, glaucoma, or cataracts is visual hallucinations. These type of hallucinations are due to a condition called Charles Bonnet Syndrome. Charles Bonnet was a Swiss philosopher in the 18th century who recognized that his grandfather’s visual hallucinations were due to his eye disorder, not mental illness. The brain creates these hallucinations because the normal amount of visual stimulus coming from the eyes is greatly reduced. The images are often complex, including detailed patterns or even fully formed...

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